Yellowstone National Park

This picture of two grazing bison was taken at the Midway Geyser Basin.  Located midway between the Upper Geyser and Lower Geyser Basins, Midway Geyser Basin Yellowstone stretches along a mile of the famous Firehole River and contains some of the most spectacular thermal features in Yellowstone Park.

Picture Number: CM1_0034

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 250     Shutter Speed: 1/500 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 140 mm

Mammoth Hot Springs is different from other thermal areas in the area. This is largely because limestone is a relatively soft type of rock, allowing the travertine formations to grow much faster than other sinter formations. It has been described as looking like a cave turned inside out. Each year, the rain and melted snow seeps into the earth. Cold to begin with, the water is quickly warmed by heat radiating from a partially molten magma chamber deep underground, the remnant of a cataclysmic volcanic explosion that occurred 600,000 years ago. After moving throughout this underwater “plumbing” system, the now hot water rises through a system of small fissures. Here it also interacts with hot gases charged with carbon dioxide rising from the magma chamber. As some of the carbon dioxide is dissolved in the hot water, a weak, carbonic acid solution is formed. In the Mammoth area, the hot, acidic solution dissolves large quantities of limestone on its way up through the rock layers to the hot springs on the surface. Above ground and exposed to the air, some of the carbon dioxide escapes from the solution. Without it, the dissolved limestone can’t remain in the solution, so it reforms into a solid mineral. This white, chalky mineral is deposited as the travertine that forms the terraces.

Picture Number: CM1_0021

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/80 sec

F-Stop: f/10     Lens: 140 mm

This is a picture of the Upper Yellowstone Falls.  The Upper Yellowstone Falls is near Canyon Village. This is a very impressive waterfall, even if it is not as impressive as the nearby Lower Falls.  The best views of the Falls are from the south side of the canyon, at the Uncle Tom's Point (where this picture was taken).  Although the Upper Falls of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone at 109 feet tall, is significantly smaller than its lower counterpart, they’re just as impressive.

Picture Number: CM1_3744

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec

F-Stop: f/11     Lens: 38 mm

This picture of a fly fisherman was taken at a parking area along the Firehole River.  The Firehole River is a famous and storied destination for serious fly fishermen. When it was discovered in the 1830s by American explorers, the Firehole was barren of trout above what is now called Firehole Falls.  Brook trout were first introduced to the upper Firehole in 1889, while brown trout, the river's most plentiful trout today, was first stocked in 1890. Rainbow trout were not introduced until 1923. Mountain whitefish are native to the Firehole below Firehole Falls. By the late 19th century, the Firehole, and Yellowstone National Park in general, was a popular destination for fishermen. In 1955 all stocking programs in the park were discontinued and today's Firehole trout are completely wild populations. In 1968, based on increasing pressure on the Firehole, the Gibbon and Madison rivers, the National Park Service designated these waters as Fly Fishing Only.

Picture Number: CM1_0089

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 280     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 90 mm

This picture – of a lone bison – was taken in Lamar Valley.  Located in the northeastern corner of the park, the Lamar Valley, along the Lamar River, in is often called America’s Serengeti for its large and easy-to-see populations of large animals.  Among its most famous inhabitants are the Junction Butte and Lamar Canyon Wolf packs; wolf enthusiasts gather with spotting scopes most days hoping to see these impressive canines in action. In addition to wolves, other animals roaming the Lamar include large herds of bison, pronghorn, badgers, grizzly bears, bald eagles, osprey, deer, and coyotes. 

Picture Number: CM1_0100

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 400     Shutter Speed: 1/400 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 140 mm

This is a picture of Old Faithful geyser taken from the 2nd floor deck of the Old Faithful Lodge.  Old Faithful is a cone geyser located in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, United States. It was named in 1870 during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition and was the first geyser in the park to receive a name. It is a highly predictable geothermal feature, and has erupted every 44 minutes to two hours since 2000. Eruptions can shoot 3,700 to 8,400 gallons of boiling water to a height of 106 to 185 feet lasting from ​11⁄2 to 5 minutes. The average height of an eruption is 145 feet.  Intervals between eruptions can range from 60 to 110 minutes, averaging 66.5 minutes in 1939, slowly increasing to an average of 90 minutes apart today, which may be the result of earthquakes affecting subterranean water levels. The disruptions have made earlier mathematical relationships inaccurate, but have actually made Old Faithful more predictable in terms of its next eruption. Between 1983 and 1994, four probes containing temperature and pressure measurement devices and video equipment were lowered into Old Faithful. The probes were lowered as deep as 72 feet. Temperature measurements of the water at this depth were 244 °F, the same as was measured in 1942.

Picture Number: CM1_0149

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 100     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 95 mm

Yellowstone's Firehole Lake Drive is a 3-mile, one-way side road off the Grand Loop located between the Old Faithful exit and Madison Junction. It has many geysers and hot springs that you can see from the road including this one - Firehole Spring.

Picture Number: CM1_0170

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/200 sec

F-Stop: f/7.1     Lens: 10 mm

Lower Falls is the most famous in the Park.  In fact, it is most likely the second most photographed spot in Yellowstone, with Old Faithful Geyser being the first.  At 308 feet, the Lower Falls is the tallest waterfall in the park. In terms of height alone, it’s more than twice the size of Niagara Falls. The amount of water flowing over the falls varies greatly depending on the season. At peak runoff times in the spring, 63,500 gal/sec flow over the falls, whereas at lower runoff times in the fall, the flow diminishes to 5,000 gal/sec. There are numerous views of the Falls from both the east (Inspiration Point, Grandview Point and Lookout Point) and west (Artists Point) sides of the Grand Canyon, most of which require only a short walk or virtually no walk to see. (This picture was taken at Artist’s Point)  The canyon’s colors were created by hot water acting on volcanic rock. It was not these colors, but the river’s yellow banks at its distant confluence with the Missouri River, that occasioned the Minnetaree Indian name which French trappers translated as roche jaune, yellow stone. The canyon has been rapidly downcut more than once, perhaps by great glacial outburst floods. Little deepening takes place today.

Picture Number: CM1_0315

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/160 sec

F-Stop: f/6.3     Lens: 27 mm

Upper Mesa Falls is a waterfall on the Henry’s Fork in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest. Upstream from Lower Mesa Falls, it is roughly 16 miles away from Ashton, Idaho. Upper Mesa Falls is roughly 114 feet high and 200 feet wide. Upper Mesa Falls – as tall as a 10-story building – pours over remnants of an ancient volcanic super-eruption that spewed ash over much of the current US. A mile south, Lower Mesa Falls repeats the performance. The river is continually chiseling away at the solidified ash and lava. Some layers are more than a million years old.  Mesa Falls Tuff, which is the rock over which Upper Mesa Falls cascades, was formed 1.3 million years ago. A cycle of rhyolitic volcanism from the Henrys Fork caldera deposited a thick layer of rock and ash across the area.  This layer compressed and hardened over time. Between 200,000 and 600,000 years ago, the river eroded a wide canyon which was subsequently partly filled with basalt lava flows. The Henrys Fork of the Snake River then carved the channel through the basalt; which is the inner canyon seen today. Upper and Lower Mesa Falls are the last prominent waterfalls on the Snake River to resist human control.

Picture Number: CM1_3677

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/200 sec

F-Stop: f/7.1     Lens: 18 mm

This is a picture of a portion of a herd of bison as it grazes alongside the Madison River. The Madison River, perhaps the most famous of all the rivers in Montana, begins in Yellowstone National Park at the confluence of the Firehole River and Gibbon River. From its origin, it flows for more than 140 miles through exceptionally beautiful scenery before it reaches the Missouri River near the town of Three Forks, Montana. 

Picture Number: CM1_3702

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 55 mm

This picture of the female bison and her youngster was taken in Hayden Valley.  This broad valley just north of the lake area and Mud Volcano thermal area is bison central. Visitors often see herds of them grazing and lounging along the wide Yellowstone River that runs through it. It’s also a good place to look for coyotes, waterfowl, grizzly bears, and wolves.

Picture Number: CM1_0029

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 800     Shutter Speed: 1/800 sec

F-Stop: f/6.3     Lens: 220 mm

While driving through the park on our way back to West Yellowstone we spotted this bison just laying down right next to the road (probably not 30 feet away).  Luckily there was a pull out just across the road.  We parked and were able to get this picture.

Picture Number: CM1_4399

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 400     Shutter Speed: 1/1250 sec

F-Stop: f/5.3     Lens: 240 mm

One of the highlights of all of Yellowstone National Park is Grand Prismatic Spring. This is a huge oval pool 370 feet across and 120 feet deep that is surrounded by unusually colorful bands of algae and travertine terraces, with wavy run off channels, giving the appearance, from above, of a giant blue star. The pool constantly bubbles and steams, forming clouds of hot mist that blow around in the breeze and sometimes make the pool itself hard to see properly.

Picture Number: CM1_4368

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 100     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 19 mm

One of the highlights of all of Yellowstone National Park is Grand Prismatic Spring. This is a huge oval pool 370 feet across and 120 feet deep that is surrounded by unusually colorful bands of algae and travertine terraces, with wavy run off channels, giving the appearance, from above, of a giant blue star. The pool constantly bubbles and steams, forming clouds of hot mist that blow around in the breeze and sometimes make the pool itself hard to see properly.

Picture Number: CM1_4348

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 100     Shutter Speed: 1/320 sec

F-Stop: f/9     Lens: 10 mm

This is a picture of Firehole Falls.  Firehole Falls is a waterfall on the Firehole River in southwestern Yellowstone National Park in the United States. The falls are located within Firehole Canyon on Firehole Canyon Drive, a one-way road that parallels the main Madison Junction to Old Faithful road. The falls are located approximately 0.5 miles upstream from the confluence of the Firehole and Gibbon Rivers at Madison Junction. Firehole Falls is a 40-foot waterfall amidst 800-foot thick lava flows forming the canyon walls. The waterfall was said to be the result of a large pool of lava that once filled the massive Yellowstone Supervolcano’s caldera. The lava eventually hardened into the more erosion-resistant rhyolite layer over which the falls dropped. The Firehole River would continue to erode away the softer layers thereby growing this waterfall over time.

Picture Number: CM1_4278

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 27 mm

This picture of two bald eagles (named Josh and Zach) was taken at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone, MT.  The Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center was started by Lewis S. Robinson, and opened in 1993 with three bears as the Grizzly Discovery Center. It was intended as a sanctuary for bears that were removed from the wild because they had become too familiar or aggressive with people. In 1995, the G.D.C was sold to New York-based Ogden Entertainment. A wolf exhibit and ten captive-born wolves were added to the center in 1996. In 1999, Ogden Entertainment decided to close the center if a buyer could not be found. Three long-term managers of the center formed a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation and purchased the center for $1.7 million.  The center then made agreements with Yellowstone National Park to host some of the park's programs and to test bear resistant containers for the US Postal Service. In 2001 it received accreditation from the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA).  In 2002, the center was renamed "Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center."

Picture Number: CM1_3974

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 400     Shutter Speed: 1/320 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 200 mm

This is a picture of a portion of a herd of bison as it grazes alongside the Madison River. The Madison River, perhaps the most famous of all the rivers in Montana, begins in Yellowstone National Park at the confluence of the Firehole River and Gibbon River. From its origin, it flows for more than 140 miles through exceptionally beautiful scenery before it reaches the Missouri River near the town of Three Forks, Montana. 

Picture Number: CM1_3866

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/200 sec

F-Stop: f/7.1     Lens: 90 mm

This picture of the Yellowstone River was taken from the Chithuen Bridge looking downstream.

Picture Number: CM1_3816

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 110     Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec

F-Stop: f/11     Lens: 18 mm

This is a picture of the Lower Yellowstone Falls. Lower Falls is the most famous in the Park.  In fact, it is most likely the second most photographed spot in Yellowstone, with Old Faithful Geyser being the first.  At 308 feet, the Lower Falls is the tallest waterfall in the park. In terms of height alone, it’s more than twice the size of Niagara Falls. The amount of water flowing over the falls varies greatly depending on the season. At peak runoff times in the spring, 63,500 gal/sec flow over the falls, whereas at lower runoff times in the fall, the flow diminishes to 5,000 gal/sec. There are numerous views of the Falls from both the east (Inspiration Point, Grandview Point and Lookout Point) and west (Artists Point) sides of the Grand Canyon, most of which require only a short walk or virtually no walk to see. (This picture was taken at Artist’s Point)  The canyon’s colors were created by hot water acting on volcanic rock. It was not these colors, but the river’s yellow banks at its distant confluence with the Missouri River, that occasioned the Minnetaree Indian name which French trappers translated as roche jaune, yellow stone. The canyon has been rapidly downcut more than once, perhaps by great glacial outburst floods. Little deepening takes place today.

Picture Number: CM1_3782

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 125     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 112 mm

This is a picture of the Lower Yellowstone Falls. Lower Falls is the most famous in the Park.  In fact, it is most likely the second most photographed spot in Yellowstone, with Old Faithful Geyser being the first.  At 308 feet, the Lower Falls is the tallest waterfall in the park. In terms of height alone, it’s more than twice the size of Niagara Falls. The amount of water flowing over the falls varies greatly depending on the season. At peak runoff times in the spring, 63,500 gal/sec flow over the falls, whereas at lower runoff times in the fall, the flow diminishes to 5,000 gal/sec. There are numerous views of the Falls from both the east (Inspiration Point, Grandview Point and Lookout Point) and west (Artists Point) sides of the Grand Canyon, most of which require only a short walk or virtually no walk to see. (This picture was taken at Artist’s Point).  The canyon’s colors were created by hot water acting on volcanic rock. It was not these colors, but the river’s yellow banks at its distant confluence with the Missouri River, that occasioned the Minnetaree Indian name which French trappers translated as roche jaune, yellow stone. The canyon has been rapidly downcut more than once, perhaps by great glacial outburst floods. Little deepening takes place today.

Picture Number: CM1_3770

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 125     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 105 mm

This is a picture of the Upper Yellowstone Falls.  The Upper Yellowstone Falls is near Canyon Village. This is a very impressive waterfall, even if it is not as impressive as the nearby Lower Falls.  The best views of the Falls are from the south side of the canyon, at the Uncle Tom's Point (where this picture was taken).  Although the Upper Falls of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone at 109 feet tall, is significantly smaller than its lower counterpart, they’re just as impressive.

Picture Number: CM1_3751

Date: May 2019

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 180     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 27 mm

This is a picture of Old Faithful geyser taken from the 2nd floor deck of the Old Faithful Lodge.  Old Faithful is a cone geyser located in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, United States. It was named in 1870 during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition and was the first geyser in the park to receive a name. It is a highly predictable geothermal feature, and has erupted every 44 minutes to two hours since 2000. Eruptions can shoot 3,700 to 8,400 gallons of boiling water to a height of 106 to 185 feet lasting from ​11⁄2 to 5 minutes. The average height of an eruption is 145 feet.  Intervals between eruptions can range from 60 to 110 minutes, averaging 66.5 minutes in 1939, slowly increasing to an average of 90 minutes apart today, which may be the result of earthquakes affecting subterranean water levels. The disruptions have made earlier mathematical relationships inaccurate, but have actually made Old Faithful more predictable in terms of its next eruption. Between 1983 and 1994, four probes containing temperature and pressure measurement devices and video equipment were lowered into Old Faithful. The probes were lowered as deep as 72 feet. Temperature measurements of the water at this depth were 244 °F, the same as was measured in 1942.

Picture Number: CM1_0161

Date:    September 2017

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   180              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8            Lens:    32 mm

Mammoth Hot Springs are different from other thermal areas in the area. This is largely because limestone is a relatively soft type of rock, allowing the travertine formations to grow much faster than other sinter formations. It has been described as looking like a cave turned inside out. Each year, the rain and melted snow seeps into the earth. Cold to begin with, the water is quickly warmed by heat radiating from a partially molten magma chamber deep underground, the remnant of a cataclysmic volcanic explosion that occurred 600,000 years ago. After moving throughout this underwater “plumbing” system, the now hot water rises through a system of small fissures. Here it also interacts with hot gases charged with carbon dioxide rising from the magma chamber. As some of the carbon dioxide is dissolved in the hot water, a weak, carbonic acid solution is formed. In the Mammoth area, the hot, acidic solution dissolves large quantities of limestone on its way up through the rock layers to the hot springs on the surface. Above ground and exposed to the air, some of the carbon dioxide escapes from the solution. Without it, the dissolved limestone can’t remain in the solution, so it reforms into a solid mineral. This white, chalky mineral is deposited as the travertine that forms the terraces.

Picture Number: CM1_0035

Date:    September 2017

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens:    140 mm

This is a picture of Old Faithful geyser taken from the 2nd floor deck of the Old Faithful Lodge.  Old Faithful is a cone geyser located in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, United States. It was named in 1870 during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition and was the first geyser in the park to receive a name. It is a highly predictable geothermal feature, and has erupted every 44 minutes to two hours since 2000. Eruptions can shoot 3,700 to 8,400 gallons of boiling water to a height of 106 to 185 feet lasting from ​11⁄2 to 5 minutes. The average height of an eruption is 145 feet.  Intervals between eruptions can range from 60 to 110 minutes, averaging 66.5 minutes in 1939, slowly increasing to an average of 90 minutes apart today, which may be the result of earthquakes affecting subterranean water levels. The disruptions have made earlier mathematical relationships inaccurate, but have actually made Old Faithful more predictable in terms of its next eruption. Between 1983 and 1994, four probes containing temperature and pressure measurement devices and video equipment were lowered into Old Faithful. The probes were lowered as deep as 72 feet. Temperature measurements of the water at this depth were 244 °F, the same as was measured in 1942.

Picture Number: CM1_0151

Date:    September 2017

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   140              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8            Lens:    95 mm

This is a picture of Old Faithful geyser taken from the 2nd floor deck of the Old Faithful Lodge.  Old Faithful is a cone geyser located in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, United States. It was named in 1870 during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition and was the first geyser in the park to receive a name. It is a highly predictable geothermal feature, and has erupted every 44 minutes to two hours since 2000. Eruptions can shoot 3,700 to 8,400 gallons of boiling water to a height of 106 to 185 feet lasting from ​11⁄2 to 5 minutes. The average height of an eruption is 145 feet.  Intervals between eruptions can range from 60 to 110 minutes, averaging 66.5 minutes in 1939, slowly increasing to an average of 90 minutes apart today, which may be the result of earthquakes affecting subterranean water levels. The disruptions have made earlier mathematical relationships inaccurate, but have actually made Old Faithful more predictable in terms of its next eruption. Between 1983 and 1994, four probes containing temperature and pressure measurement devices and video equipment were lowered into Old Faithful. The probes were lowered as deep as 72 feet. Temperature measurements of the water at this depth were 244 °F, the same as was measured in 1942.

Picture Number: CM1_0148

Date:    September 2017

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8          Lens:    95 mm

Gibbon Falls is a waterfall on the Gibbon River in northwestern Yellowstone National Park. Gibbon Falls has a drop of approximately 84 feet. The falls are located roadside, 4.7 miles upstream from the confluence of the Gibbon and Firehole Rivers at Madison Junction on the Grand Loop Road.  This segmented cascade flows near the Yellowstone Caldera rim which was formed 600,000 years ago. The falls are easily accessible along one of Yellowstone's major thoroughfares, making this an often-crowded spot.  The falls is a large one which is split in two by a band of rock in the middle. The flow of water on the right is the stronger of the two. As the Gibbon River courses down the right side, it strikes a ledge, shooting the water into the air with a rooster tail effect. The water to the left spreads out into a wide cascade which is shallower.  When the Washburn and Hayden parties traveled through the Firehole River and Gibbon River basins in the 1870s, the Gibbon River above Gibbon Falls was barren of fish, the falls being a natural barrier to upstream migration. Unlike the Yellowstone drainage, the upper Gibbon was isolated from any connection to drainages on the Pacific slope. The absence of fish was overcome in 1890 when the first Rainbow trout were introduced into the river above the falls. In 1920, Arctic Grayling, native in the Gibbon and Madison Rivers below the falls were stocked in Grebe Lake at the headwaters of the Gibbon. Today, the falls still block upstream migrations of spawning trout from the Madison River, but the upper Gibbon has become a consistent trout fishery because of these introductions.

Picture Number: CM1_0038

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 220     Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 18 mm

While driving Yellowstone’s Upper Loop road we stopped at Mammoth Hot Springs.  Mammoth Hot Springs had been the park’s headquarters during the time the park was managed by the US Army.  As we explored the area, we saw this bull elk resting between what had been, during the army’s presence, the Bachelor Offices Quarters (BOQ) and the Captain’s Quarters.  Judging from the size of his antlers he must have been several years old and he was completely at home.  The excitement he caused by his presence in this highly active area was completely ignored by him.

Picture Number: CM1_0063

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/80 sec

F-Stop: f/10     Lens: 140 mm

This picture was taken at Terrance Springs.  Terrace Springs is a thermal region adjacent to the southwest corner of Gibbon Geyser Basin.  Terrace Springs is located next to the highway north of Madison. The spouting activity is not caused by high temperatures, since the springs exhibit only about 140 °F, but by a mixture of evaporating gases, mainly carbon dioxide.

Picture Number: CM1_0026

Date: September 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/200 sec

F-Stop: f/7.1     Lens: 18 mm

This is a picture of the Keppler Cascades. Kepler Cascades is a waterfall on the Firehole River in southwestern Yellowstone National Park in. The cascades are located approximately 2.6 miles south of Old Faithful. The cascades drop approximately 150 feet over multiple drops. This three-tiered cascade drops over 50 feet as the Firehole River flows North.  The cascades are located very near to and visible from the Old Faithful to West Thumb road.  The Kepler Cascades were actually named in 1881 for the 12-year-old son of Wyoming’s territorial governor, Kepler Hoyt, who toured the park with his father, Governor John Hoyt.

Picture Number: CM1_0125

Date: May 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/200 sec

F-Stop: f/7.1     Lens: 18 mm

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Last updated on 3 October 2020