Alaska

Our trip on the White Pass and Yukon Rail Road was one-way.  The return to Skagway was made via bus.  This picture of the country side (and #1573) was made from the bus as we returned to Skagway.

Picture Number: CM1_1588

Date: May 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/1600 sec

F-Stop: f/20     Lens: 75 mm

The White Pass and Yukon Railroad is a Class II 3 ft narrow-gauge railroad linking the port of Skagway, Alaska, with Whitehorse, the capital of the Yukon. An isolated system, the White Pass and Yukon Railroad has no direct connection to any other railroad.  This picture was taken from the train looking back towards the harbor in Skagway.

Picture Number: CM1_1381

Date: May 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 100     Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec

F-Stop: f/11     Lens: 18 mm

Our trip on the White Pass and Yukon Rail Road was one-way.  The return to Skagway was made via bus.  This picture of the country side (and #1588) was made from the bus as we returned to Skagway.

Picture Number: CM1_1573

Date: May 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/1600 sec

F-Stop: f/16     Lens: 116 mm

This picture was taken during the our Tracy Arm excursion, at the Sawyer Glacier. The face of Sawyer Glacier is a little more than a half mile wide. Sawyer Glacier is an active tidewater glacier, which means it “calves” or breaks off. Pieces of ice, anywhere from the size of a small car to a cruise ship, fall off the face of the glacier and hit the water with a thunderous roar. The water at the end of the fjord is nearly 600 feet deep.  The small crafts that you see in this picture are "Zodiac" type boats launched from other excursion ships for a much closer view.

Picture Number: CM1_1053Date: May 2018
Camera: Nikon D7100
ISO: 180     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec
F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 22 mm

After visiting the glaciers in Misty Fjord, we were traveling to Juneau to reboard the cruise ship on the excursion craft when we passed this little waterfall.

Picture Number: CM1_1155

Date: May 2018
Camera: Nikon D7100
ISO: 100     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec
F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 90 mm

This picture was taken during the Tracy Arm excursion, at the Sawyer Glacier. The face of Sawyer Glacier is a little more than a half mile wide. Sawyer Glacier is an active tidewater glacier, which means it “calves” or breaks off. Pieces of ice, anywhere from the size of a small car to a cruise ship, fall off the face of the glacier and hit the water with a thunderous roar. The water at the end of the fjord is nearly 600 feet deep.

Picture Number: CM1_1042

Date: May 2018
Camera: Nikon D7100
ISO: 180     Shutter Speed: 1/125 sec
F-Stop: f/11     Lens: 24 mm

This is a picture of South Sawyer Glacier. Due to the icy conditions (the large amount of floating ice) our boat was not able to approach the glacier as close as some do during the summer months. One of two tidewater glaciers at the head of Tracy Arm, South Sawyer Glacier extends deep underwater and makes for a very blue iceberg. It is the larger of the two glaciers, and, if conditions are good, you can come within ½ mile of the face.

Picture Number: CM1_0909

Date: May 2018
Camera: Nikon D7100
ISO: 400     Shutter Speed: 1/1600 sec
F-Stop: f/6.3     Lens: 75 mm

This picture (and #0811) was taken during our excursion to South Sawyer Glacier. One of two tidewater glaciers at the head of Tracy Arm.Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after the Secretary of the Navy Benjamin Franklin Tracy. It is located about 45 miles south of Juneau and 70 miles north of Petersburg, Alaska, off of Holkham Bay and adjacent to Stephens Passage within the Tongass National Forest. 

Picture Number: CM1_0854

Date: May 2018
Camera: Nikon D7100
ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/400 sec
F-Stop: f/7.1     Lens: 105 mm

This is a picture of New Eddystone Rock in the Misty Fjords National Monument. Misty Fjords National Monument is a national monument and wilderness area administered by the U.S. Forest Service as part of the Tongass National Forest.  During the last ice age the weight of the ice pressed down and compressed the underlying crust, including the area that is now Behm Canal. As the ice melted this weight was reduced. This movement broke the rock and created the New Eddystone volcano. While the portion of the volcano below sea level is somewhat cone-shaped, wave action over the millennia has eroded all the rock above sea level except the dense, spire-shaped volcanic plug.

Picture Number: CM1_0437

Date: May 2018
Camera: Nikon D7100
ISO: 100     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec
F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 56 mm

This is a picture of South Sawyer Glacier as we approached it on the excursion boat (you can see the glacier just past the land). One of two tidewater glaciers at the head of Tracy Arm, South Sawyer Glacier extends deep underwater and makes for a very blue iceberg. It is the larger of the two glaciers, and if conditions are good you can come within ½ mile of the face.

Picture Number: CM1_0866

Date: May 2018
Camera: Nikon D7100
ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/320 sec
F-Stop: f/6.3     Lens: 66 mm

This picture (and #0854) was taken during our excursion to South Sawyer Glacier. One of two tidewater glaciers at the head of Tracy Arm. Tracy Arm is a fjord in Alaska near Juneau. It is named after the Secretary of the Navy Benjamin Franklin Tracy. It is located about 45 miles south of Juneau and 70 miles north of Petersburg, Alaska, off of Holkham Bay and adjacent to Stephens Passage within the Tongass National Forest.

Picture Number: CM1_0811

Date: May 2018
Camera: Nikon D7100
ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/100 sec
F-Stop: f/11     Lens: 40 mm

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Last updated on 3 October 2020