Southern California Beaches

After two years of not being able to travel and take any pictures; the weather forecast said there were going to be higher than normal surf for the next day.  So I decided to go down to the beach to see if I could find anything interesting that I could photograph.  Over the next several weeks I made several visits to various Southern California beaches and beach related sites.  The following are the results of those visits.

Redondo Beach Pier

CM1_5163.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5163

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/640 sec

F-Stop:  f/6.3         Lens:    200 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5159

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   125              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens:    98 mm

CM1_5159.jpeg
CM2_0463.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_0463

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/640 sec

F-Stop:  f/6.3         Lens:    200 mm

Torrance Beach

Picture Number: CM1_5228

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   140              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens:    98 mm

CM1_5228.jpeg
CM1_5170.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5170

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/500 sec

F-Stop:  f/5.6         Lens:    200 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5272

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/500 sec

F-Stop:  f/5.6          Lens:    200 mm

CM1_5172.jpeg

Ventura Marina

CM1_5243.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5243

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/160 sec

F-Stop:  f/11         Lens:    195 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5244

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/160 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens:   170 mm

CM1_5244.jpeg
CM1_5256.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5256

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11         Lens:   300 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5270

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens:   175 mm

CM1_5270.jpeg
CM1_5283.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5283

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   125              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11         Lens:   300 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5371

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/100 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens:  75 mm

CM1_5321.jpeg

Point Vicente Lighthouse

Point Vicente Lighthouse is located in Rancho Palos Verdes, California. It is 67 feet tall and stands on a cliff with a height of 130 feet. It is just north of the entrances to the Los Angeles/Long Beach Harbors and is between Point Loma Lighthouse to the south and Point Conception Lighthouse to the north. The lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. The lighthouse is owned by the United States federal government and is managed by the United States Coast Guard. It is not usually open to the public, but the Coast Guard Auxiliary run tours once per month and it is used annually for the city's "Whale of a Day" festival.

Point Vicente Lighthouse was built in 1926, following years of complaints by shippers about the dangerous waters around the Palos Verdes peninsula. It was constructed using a Parisian Fresnel lens with a width of 5 feet, which had been in use in Alaska since its construction in 1886. In 1934 the Long Beach Radio Station opened in a neighboring building, which was used to monitor for distress signals. The light source was dimmed to just 25 watts during World War II to avoid aiding the enemy. It was automated in 1971, and the radio station was closed in 1980. In 2015, the Coast Guard announced its intention to replace the original third order lens with an LED light with a 14 nm range, replacing the current light and lens. In February 2019 the lens was removed from the light room.  The Coast Guard Light List specifies its light characteristic as being a pair of two white flashes, repeating that pair every 20 seconds. An emergency light of reduced intensity operates if the main light is extinguished.

CM1_5339.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5339

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   110              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11         Lens:  122 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5341

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens:  75 mm

CM1_5341.jpeg
CM1_5338.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5338

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   125              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11         Lens:    55 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5350

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/320 sec

F-Stop:  f/9          Lens:  20 mm

CM1_5350.jpeg
CM1_5354.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5354

Date:    January 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   110              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8         Lens:   30 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5494

Date:    FEBRUARY 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/400 sec

F-Stop:  f/10          Lens:  86 mm

CM1_5494.jpeg

Point Fermin Lighthouse

Built in 1874, the Point Fermin Lighthouse was the first navigational light into the San Pedro Bay. Phineas Banning, with the support of many local businessmen, petitioned the Federal Government and the US lighthouse Board to place a lighthouse on the point in 1854. Although the Lighthouse Board agreed funding and land disputes delayed its construction until 1874.

The lighthouse was staffed by federal employees under the Treasury Department and regulated by the US Lighthouse Board. These employees were called Lighthouse Keepers. It was their job to keep the light lit as a beacon for ships, maintain the lighthouse lens, and the general up-keep of the building. Point Fermin's first lighthouse keepers were women. Mary and Ella Smith came from a lighthouse family and their brother Victor, a Washington Territory customs officer, was no doubt influential in getting them their positions.

In 2002, the lighthouse was restored, retrofitted, and rehabilitated for public access with funds from the City of Los Angeles, the Port of Los Angeles, and the State of California. The lighthouse was opened to the public on November 1, 2003 under the management of the Department of Recreation and Parks for the City of Los Angeles. Volunteers from the Point Fermin Lighthouse Society serve as tour guides and help to keep the lighthouse open to the public.

Picture Number: CM1_5397

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/320 sec

F-Stop:  f/9          Lens:  18 mm

CM1_5397.jpeg
CM1_5403.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5403

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/320 sec

F-Stop:  f/9         Lens:   17 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5505

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/2000 sec

F-Stop:  f/5.6        Lens:  140 mm

CM1_5505.jpeg
CM1_5509.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5509

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/320 sec

F-Stop:  f/9         Lens:   10 mm

Korean Friendship Bell

This massive and intricately-decorated bell and pavilion were donated in 1976 to the people of Los Angeles by the people of the Republic of Korea to celebrate the bicentennial of the U.S. independence, honor veterans of the Korean War, and to consolidate traditional friendship between the two countries. The bell is patterned after the Bronze Bell of King Songdok, which was cast in 771 A.D. and is still on view in South Korea today.

The bell was cast in Korea and shipped to the United States. Weighing 17 tons, with a height of twelve feet and a diameter of 7-1/2 feet, the bell is made of copper and tin, with gold, nickel, lead and phosphorous added for tone quality. When it was built, it cost the Korean people $500,000. Four pairs of figures, each pair consisting of the Goddess of Liberty holding a torch, and a Korean spirit, are engraved in relief on the body of the bell. Each of the Korean spirits holds up a different symbol: a symbolic design of the Korean flag; a branch of the rose of Sharon, Korea’s national flower; a branch of laurel, symbol of victory; and a dove of peace. The bell has no clapper but is struck from the outside with a wooden log.
The bell is set in a pagoda-like stone structure which was constructed on the site by thirty craftsmen flown in from Korea. It took them ten months and costs $569,680. The pavilion is supported by twelve columns representing the twelve designs of the Oriental zodiac. Animals stand guard at the base of each column. Recently the Korean Bell underwent extensive renovation and restoration. On January 10, 2014 the Tarps were removed.

Resting peacefully on the knoll overlooking the sea gate from which U.S. troops sailed into the Pacific, the bell site affords an unsurpassed view of the Los Angeles harbor, the Catalina Channel, and the sea terraces of San Pedro hill. The bell is rung each year on: Independence Day, July 4, National Liberation Day of Korea, August 15, 9:00a.m.-12 Noon and New Year’s Eve, September 17 to coincide with bell ringings around the country to celebrate Constitution week, also on January 13 for Korean-American Day. The Bell is also rung 13 times on the 1st Saturday of the month at 11:30 a.m.

Picture Number: CM1_5414

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   180              Shutter Speed:  1/1000 sec

F-Stop:  f/8          Lens:  80 mm

CM1_5414.jpeg
CM1_5417.jpeg

As you approach the Korean Bell of Friendship you are greeted by two totem poles placed there to mark the boundary between the outside world and the Temple of the Korean Friendship Bell.  These are Jangseung totems and there is a difference between them and the totems of people on the islands of the Pacific Northwest.  Unlike totem poles, they don’t tell stories.  Jangseung are Korean guardian spirit poles that protect against evil spirits, misfortune, and disease.  They are placed at the entrance of a village, temple, etc. to mark the boundary between it and the outside world.  Jangseung totems are also expected to bring good fortune.  The Jangseung figures at the entry that leads to the Korean Friendship Bell are carved from round posts of wood. The one on the left is male and on the right is female and they are in traditional Korean headwear that dates to the Third Kingdom era.  The inscription on the male Jangseung, is “Great General Under Heaven”. The inscription on the female Jangseung is “Great General under Earth.”

Picture Number: CM1_5417

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/320 sec

F-Stop:  f/9         Lens:   24 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5419

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   180              Shutter Speed:  1/400 sec

F-Stop:  f/10         Lens:  38 mm

CM1_5419.jpeg

Wayfarers Chapel

Wayfarers Chapel began as a dream in the mind of Elizabeth Sewall Schellenberg, a member of the Swedenborgian Church who lived on the Palos Verdes Peninsula in the late 1920s. The Peninsula was largely open farmland with a two-lane gravel road skirting the shoreline from San Pedro to Palos Verdes Estates. Mrs. Schellenberg dreamed of a small chapel of exquisite beauty and spiritual architecture on a hillside above the Pacific Ocean where wayfarers could stop to rest, meditate, and give thanks to God.

The church was designed by Lloyd Wright (son of Frank Lloyd Wright) in the late 1940s and was built between 1949 and 1951. Wright departed from the tradition of using masonry in order to "achieve a delicate enclosure that allows the surrounding landscape to define the sacred space". Additions were built in later years, including a tower and a visitor center, the latter of which had been lost in a landslide during the 1960s.

As with many of Wright's buildings, the chapel features geometric designs and incorporates the natural landscape into the design. When the Chapel was completed in 1951 it stood alone like a precious jewel on a deserted dusty knoll overlooking the blue Pacific. Today, what you are looking at is a “tree chapel.” Chapel architect Lloyd Wright had been inspired by the cathedral-like majesty of the redwood trees in northern California. The redwood trees that surround Wayfarers Chapel are forming living walls and roof to a natural sanctuary encased in glass with view of the surrounding forest and nearby Pacific Ocean. These are typical traits of Organic Architecture, which aims at using nature as the framework and regards the space inside as sacred. Lloyd Wright’s design of Wayfarers Chapel is the perfect combination of nature and architectural genius and is one of the foremost examples of organic architecture. Wayfarers Chapel is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

CM1_5365.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_55365

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8         Lens:   12 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5369

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8           Lens:  18 mm

CM1_5369.jpeg
CM1_5377.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5377

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/200 sec

F-Stop:  f/7.1         Lens:   23 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5379

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   140              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8           Lens:  27 mm

CM1_5379.jpeg
CM1_5380.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5380

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/320 sec

F-Stop:  f/8           Lens:   14 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5481

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   320              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/5.6           Lens:  38 mm

CM1_5481.jpeg
CM1_5498.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5498

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   110              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8           Lens:   30 mm

Cabrillo Beach

Picture Number: CM1_5435

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8            Lens:   122 mm

CM1_5435.jpeg
CM1_5441.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5441

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/800 sec

F-Stop:  f/7.1        Lens: 56 mm

Picture Number: CM2_0482

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/800 sec

F-Stop:  f/7.2         Lens:   230 mm

CM2_0482.jpeg
CM1_5444.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5444

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/640 sec

F-Stop:  f/6.3        Lens: 200 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5460

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/200 sec

F-Stop:  f/13         Lens:   300 mm

CM1_5460.jpeg
CM1_5465.jpeg

Picture Number: CM1_5465

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/125 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens: 210 mm

Picture Number: CM1_5434

Date:    February 2022

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   200              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8           Lens:   122 mm

CM1_5434.jpeg