Death Valley National Park

This picture was taken rather early in the morning at the Mesquite Flat Dunes.  These dunes are the best known and easiest to visit in the national park. Located in central Death Valley near Stovepipe Wells, access is from Hwy. 190 or from the unpaved Sand Dunes Road. Although the highest dune rises only about 100 feet, the dunes actually cover a vast area. This dune field includes three types of dunes: crescent, linear, and star shaped. Polygon-cracked clay of an ancient lakebed forms the floor. Mesquite trees have created large hummocks that provide stable habitats for wildlife.  Dunes are formed when the sand is “trapped” by geographic features such as mountains.

Picture Number: CM1_3300

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/2500 sec

F-Stop: f/6.3     Lens: 140 mm

This picture is of a fallen mesquite tree.  It was taken at the Mesquite Flat Dunes (seen in the background).  These dunes are the best known and easiest to visit in the national park. Located in central Death Valley near Stovepipe Wells,

Picture Number: CM1_0040

Date: March 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 140 mm

This picture (and #3486) was taken from the parking lot at the hotel in Stove Pipe Wells.  We had been staying there and were in the process of packing the car for the drive home. It was just a few minutes before 8 AM and the sun was rising in the East.  This view is towards the West to the rising sun cast a pinkish glow over the clouds and mountains.  If you compare this picture with #3486, which was taken only about 5 minutes before, you can see how rapidly the sky changed colors as the sun rose.  Notice that the bird (visible in picture #3486) in the time between pictures has flown away.

Picture Number: CM1_3486

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/800 sec

F-Stop: f/7.1     Lens: 56 mm

This picture was taken at the Mesquite Flat Dunes (seen in the background).  These dunes are the best known and easiest to visit in the national park. Located in central Death Valley near Stovepipe Wells,

Picture Number: CM1_0038

Date: March 2017

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 140 mm

This picture (and #3498) was taken from the parking lot at the hotel in Stove Pipe Wells.  We had been staying there and were in the process of packing the car for the drive home. It was just a few minutes before 8 AM and the sun was rising in the East.  This view is towards the West so the rising sun cast a pinkish glow over the clouds and mountains.  If you compare this picture with #3498, which was taken only about 5 minutes later, you can see how rapidly the sky changed colors as the sun rose.   Do you see the bird perched on one of the tree branches?  (It’s a dove.)

Picture Number: CM1_3486

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/1250 sec

F-Stop: f/9     Lens: 56 mm

This picture (and #3319) was taken at Furnace Creek.  It is taken from the West side of the road looking towards the East.  The visitor center, museum, and headquarters of the Death Valley National Park are located at Furnace Creek.  The elevation of Furnace Creek is 190 feet below sea level. Furnace Creek holds the record for the highest reliably recorded air temperature on Earth at 134 °F on July 10, 1913, as well as the highest recorded natural ground surface temperature on Earth at 201 °F  on July 15, 1972.

Picture Number: CM1_3318

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/6400 sec

F-Stop: f/13     Lens: 18 mm

This picture was taken at The Devil’s Golf Course.  This area gets its name from a guidebook back in the ’30s that stated: “Only the devil could play golf on such a surface.” When the miners were exploring this area, they saw that the salt and gravel beds could extend up to 1000 feet deep in some parts.  The Devil’s Golf Course is a short stop on the drive between Badwater and Furnace Creek. The Devils Golf Course is made up of large salt formations that jut out of the barren landscape for as far as the eye can see.

Picture Number: CM1_3340

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/800 sec

F-Stop: f/16     Lens: 27 mm

This picture (and #3318) was taken at Furnace Creek.  It is taken from the West side of the road looking towards the East.  The visitor center, museum, and headquarters of the Death Valley National Park are located at Furnace Creek.  The elevation of Furnace Creek is 190 feet below sea level. Furnace Creek holds the record for the highest reliably recorded air temperature on Earth at 134 °F on July 10, 1913, as well as the highest recorded natural ground surface temperature on Earth at 201 °F on July 15, 1972.

Picture Number: CM1_3319

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/1000 sec

F-Stop: f/16     Lens: 18 mm

This picture was taken at The Devil’s Golf Course.  This area gets its name from a guidebook back in the ’30s that stated: “Only the devil could play golf on such a surface.” When the miners were exploring this area, they saw that the salt and gravel beds could extend up to 1000 feet deep in some parts.  The Devil’s Golf Course is a short stop on the drive between Badwater and Furnace Creek. The Devils Golf Course is made up of large salt formations that jut out of the barren landscape for as far as the eye can see.

Picture Number: CM1_3350

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/800 sec

F-Stop: f/14     Lens: 35 mm

This picture of Bad Water Basin is from the boardwalk looking West.  Reportedly this area was named Badwater because a traveler was coming through and saw that there was water for his mule to drink. However, because the water is so full of salt, the animal refused to drink it, and thus the name Badwater was born.  Badwater Basin is the lowest point in North America, with an elevation of 282 ft below sea level. Significant rainstorms can flood the area periodically, covering the salt pan with a thin sheet of standing water. However, this does not last long, because the 1.9 inches of average rainfall is overwhelmed by a 150-inch annual evaporation rate.

Picture Number: CM1_3364

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/800 sec

F-Stop: f/14     Lens: 38 mm

This picture was taken on the highway (SR-190) between Furnace Creek and Mesquite Flat Dunes looking North.   

Picture Number: CM1_3415

Date: November 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 1600     Shutter Speed: 1/1600 sec

F-Stop: f/10     Lens: 66 mm

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Last updated on 3 October 2020