Arches National Park

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This is a picture of Double Arch in Arches National Park. Arches National Park lies north of Moab in the state of Utah. Bordered by the Colorado River in the southeast, it’s known as the site of more than 2,000 natural sandstone arches.  The Windows Section of the park is located 9 miles north on the park road and 2.5 miles east on the Windows road. From the Windows parking lot you can take an easywalk to Double Arch.

Picture Number: CM1_1906

Date: September 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/160 sec

F-Stop: f/6.3     Lens: 66 mm

The Three Gossips is one of the first unique rock formations you can see when you drive along the Arches Scenic Drive in the Arches National Park. The rock really looks like three people stand right next to each other and gossiping. (At other angles the rocks look like groundhogs trying to watch surroundings). It is a mid-sized sandstone tower (about 350 feet at its tallest wall) sitting atop a roundish pedestal within the Courthouse Towers "cluster" that also includes The Organ (see picture #1841).

Picture Number: CM1_1842

Date: September 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 320     Shutter Speed: 1/500 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 140 mm

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This is a picture of The Organ in Arches National Park. The Organ is the twin-towered butte that looms above the parking lot at the Courthouse Towers Viewpoint. Standing roughly 500 ft tall this formation is impressive from any vantage, perhaps most so when it first comes into view on the park road.  When approaching Courthouse Towers, this freestanding fin appears as an immense mountain of sandstone. And here especially, looks can be deceptive. A side view unveils a thin, fragile and gravity defying fin of sandstone. A narrow sliver of salmon-colored Entrada sandstone is all that's left standing after the surrounding salt bed and softer rock material have been eroded away. Arches National Park rests over the Moab fault, contributing to the instability of the area. Positioned over a very unstable salt bed, movements in the earth initiated long, vertical cracks in the sandstone. Wind and water erosion, plus immense pressures (video) have turned these ancient rock formations into the enormous fins and arches seen today. 

Picture Number: CM1_1841

Date: September 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: f/8     Lens: 80 mm

Balanced Rock, one of the most iconic features in the park, stands a staggering 128 feet tall. Unlike many of the other named features in the park, Balanced Rock can be seen from the park road. It is located 9.2 miles from the Arches Visitor Center. Although parking is limited, many visitors stop to complete the short hike (0.3 mi roundtrip) around the rock’s base for unusual and up-close perspectives.  Balanced Rock is made of two different rock formations. The rock itself is Entrada Sandstone, the primary arch-building formation in the park. The pedestal it sits on is part of the Carmel Formation, which erodes more easily.

Picture Number: CM1_1865

Date: September 2018

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/500 sec

F-Stop: f/5.6     Lens: 140 mm

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