Grand Canyon National Park

This picture of the Grand Canyon (and #0040) was taken from Yavapai Point. Yavapai Point occupies a special place in the history of the establishment of Grand Canyon National Park. Shortly after the Grand Canyon was made an official National Park in 1919, the National Park Service set out to found a museum for the study of the area’s many geological wonders, to be constructed somewhere along the South Rim. After much debate, Yavapai Point was chosen to be the home of this facility. The reasoning for this decision was that from Yavapai Point you can see every single kind of notable geological feature existing throughout the Grand Canyon area. This became the Yavapai Museum of Geology.

Picture Number: CM1_0034B

Date: June 2015

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 100     Shutter Speed: 1/200 sec

F-Stop: f/13     Lens: 18 mm

This picture (and #0034A) is of the Grand Canyon from Mojave Point.  These both are focused on the Colorado River, but this picture was taken with a slightly longer focal length lens.  Thus, the river is much more visible.

Picture Number: CM1_0035

Date: September 2016

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/100 sec

F-Stop: f/11     Lens: 40 mm

This picture (and #0035) is of the Grand Canyon from Mojave Point.  These both are focused on the Colorado River, but this picture was taken with a slightly shorter focal length lens.  Thus, more of the canyon is visible, but the river is much harder to see.

Picture Number: CM1_0034A

Date: Swptember 2016

Camera: Nikon D7100

ISO: 200     Shutter Speed: 1/80 sec

F-Stop: f/10     Lens: 18 mm

This picture (as well as #’s 0007, 0019 and 0029) was taken from Yaki Point while waiting for sunset.  Yaki Point is one of the most popular places along the South Rim to take sunset pictures. Compared to its neighboring viewing stations of Yavapai Point and Mather Point, Yaki Point offers visitors a unique vantage point. This is because Yaki Point occupies a different promontory than its surrounding stops along the East Rim. These special views include several striking landmarks. To the west, you can see portions of the Tonto Trail, as well as the final sections of the Bright Angel Trail. To the east, you can glimpse Cremation Creek, while across the canyon to the North Rim you will see a variety of stunning red mesas near Clear Creek.

Picture Number: CM1_0004

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   400              Shutter Speed:  1/160 sec

F-Stop:  f/6.3         Lens:    23 mm

This picture (as well as #’s 0004, 0019 and 0029) was taken from Yaki Point while waiting for sunset.  Yaki Point is one of the most popular places along the South Rim to take sunset pictures. Compared to its neighboring viewing stations of Yavapai Point and Mather Point, Yaki Point offers visitors a unique vantage point. This is because Yaki Point occupies a different promontory than its surrounding stops along the East Rim. These special views include several striking landmarks. To the west, you can see portions of the Tonto Trail, as well as the final sections of the Bright Angel Trail. To the east, you can glimpse Cremation Creek, while across the canyon to the North Rim you will see a variety of stunning red mesas near Clear Creek.

Picture Number: CM1_0007

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   400              Shutter Speed:  1/250 sec

F-Stop:  f/8            Lens:    23 mm

This picture (as well as #’s 0004, 0007 and 0029) was taken from Yaki Point while waiting for sunset.  Yaki Point is one of the most popular places along the South Rim to take sunset pictures. Compared to its neighboring viewing stations of Yavapai Point and Mather Point, Yaki Point offers visitors a unique vantage point. This is because Yaki Point occupies a different promontory than its surrounding stops along the East Rim. These special views include several striking landmarks. To the west, you can see portions of the Tonto Trail, as well as the final sections of the Bright Angel Trail. To the east, you can glimpse Cremation Creek, while across the canyon to the North Rim you will see a variety of stunning red mesas near Clear Creek.

Picture Number: CM1_0019

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   320              Shutter Speed:  1/60 sec

F-Stop:  f/10          Lens:    18 mm

This picture (as well as #’s 0004, 0007 and 0019) was taken from Yaki Point while waiting for sunset.  Yaki Point is one of the most popular places along the South Rim to take sunset pictures. Compared to its neighboring viewing stations of Yavapai Point and Mather Point, Yaki Point offers visitors a unique vantage point. This is because Yaki Point occupies a different promontory than its surrounding stops along the East Rim. These special views include several striking landmarks. To the west, you can see portions of the Tonto Trail, as well as the final sections of the Bright Angel Trail. To the east, you can glimpse Cremation Creek, while across the canyon to the North Rim you will see a variety of stunning red mesas near Clear Creek.

Picture Number: CM1_0029

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   280              Shutter Speed:  1/60 sec

F-Stop:  f/10          Lens:    40 mm

This picture of the Grand Canyon (and #0034B) was taken from Yavapai Point. Yavapai Point occupies a special place in the history of the establishment of Grand Canyon National Park. Shortly after the Grand Canyon was made an official National Park in 1919, the National Park Service set out to found a museum for the study of the area’s many geological wonders, to be constructed somewhere along the South Rim. After much debate, Yavapai Point was chosen to be the home of this facility. The reasoning for this decision was that from Yavapai Point you can see every single kind of notable geological feature existing throughout the Grand Canyon area. This became the Yavapai Museum of Geology.

Picture Number: CM1_0040

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/200 sec

F-Stop:  f/13          Lens:    18 mm

This picture (and #0109) was taken at Yaki Point after waiting several hours for sunset to arrive.  After taking this picture, because of the large number of people there, I had to wait until about 11 PM to finally catch a bus from Yaki Point to my hotel bus stop.  Yaki Point is the ideal overlook to enjoy a sunrise or sunset over the Canyon. It is a perfect location for shooting picture-perfect views of the dramatic and vivid color changes as the sun rises and sets over the immense beauty.

Picture Number: CM1_0046

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   100              Shutter Speed:  1/500 sec

F-Stop:  f/11          Lens:    26 mm

This picture of the Grand Canyon (and #0105) was taken from Yaki Point on the East Rim Drive. The East Rim Drive isn’t the most popular route for visitors, but Yaki Point gives many a reason to visit the East Rim by providing one of the most striking viewpoints of the canyon available. Encompassing a vast swath of the canyon, you can see the end of the Bright Angel Trail and much of the South Kaibab Trail as it begins to reach towards the O’Neill Butte and Cedar Ridge. To the east, you’ll see Cremation Creek and a handful of incredible buttes and mesas. 

Picture Number: CM1_0084

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   400              Shutter Speed:  1/400 sec

F-Stop:  f/10          Lens:    35 mm

This picture of the Grand Canyon (and #0084) was taken from Yaki Point on the East Rim Drive. The East Rim Drive isn’t the most popular route for visitors, but Yaki Point gives many a reason to visit the East Rim by providing one of the most striking viewpoints of the canyon available. Encompassing a vast swath of the canyon, you can see the end of the Bright Angel Trail and much of the South Kaibab Trail as it begins to reach towards the O’Neill Butte and Cedar Ridge. To the east, you’ll see Cremation Creek and a handful of incredible buttes and mesas.

Picture Number: CM1_0105

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   400              Shutter Speed:  1/400 sec

F-Stop:  f/10          Lens:    27 mm

This picture (and #0046) was taken at Yaki Point after waiting several hours for sunset to arrive.  After taking this picture, because of the large number of people there, I had to wait until about 11 PM to finally catch a bus from Yaki Point to my hotel bus stop.  Yaki Point is the ideal overlook to enjoy a sunrise or sunset over the Canyon. It is a perfect location for shooting picture-perfect views of the dramatic and vivid color changes as the sun rises and sets over the immense beauty.

Picture Number: CM1_0109

Date:    June 2015

Camera:    Nikon D7100

ISO:   720              Shutter Speed:  1/1000 sec

F-Stop:  f/4.6         Lens:    35 mm

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Last updated on 9 November 2020